Going with the flow

IMG_7441This morning I was out walking and ran into a neighbor (that I did not know was my neighbor) & she said, “Don’t I know you?” I have had this happen to me on more than one occasion & I just smile. I am a bit of an introvert, so going door to door to meet my neighbors is on very limited & brief occasions.

We began walking together & talking to get reacquainted. She began to open up about her journey of depression, anxiety, bipolar, mood disorders that she has had to learn to deal with over the years because every single one of her four children has varying mood/emotional disorders. I told her she needed a hug for just going through that journey. I can’t even imagine.

 

Canoeing in Kidney Pond, Baxter State Park, Maine, USA. Image shot 2001. Exact date unknown.Our conversation reminded me of the different journeys we are all on. We each have varying degrees of difficulty, but we find a way. We find a way to float down the river of life in the currents we are meant to learn from. Some of us have years of rapids in dealing with struggling children. Some of us have a slow moving flow when we can find gratitude for where we are. Some of us get stuck in a whirlpool of addiction & are unsure how to get out. Some of us have a combination of calm waters and then a big drop off into a giant rapid of emotions & struggle within different life situations.

I am in a hard current at the moment, but we are doing are best to paddle through. My husband had to take a job in another state & just moved away from us over the weekend. My daughter is in the middle of a school project that she cannot leave the state residence for, fear of being disqualified. In my twenty-three plus years of marriage I have never been away from my husband for over a week. That whole week I could not sleep & it was tough to have him gone.

Because of our housing situation we knew we could not afford two mortgages, so my husband is sacrificing & living in an RV trailer. We know he will be in Nevada for at least 7-8 months running a retail store. My daughter was in tears for days, but we knew we needed to be strong & handle things the best we could.

LoveYouPillowsMy daughter & I tried to figure out what we could do to make him feel like he had a little bit of home with him, so we bought two pillow cases that said, “I Love you” & “I Love you more.” We sat down and wrote a love letter on each pillow.  We also got him a travel companion stuffed animal hog named “Bula Bula” which means Welcome, Hello, Goodbye, Love in Fijian (my husband loves survivor–it was a tribe name). We had family send little love notes he could open each day & decked out his new home with big towels & comfy blankets. How do you make an RV feel like home? We tried. Smile. Smile.

He left Saturday morning & it was hard to see him drive away. We have called him over 40 times in the last couple of days. What else can you do?

As a family we know it will be hard, but we are trying to look at this as a life adventure. We are going to plan to see new places, challenge ourselves by stepping out of our comfort spaces and reaching for new ways to stay connected.

The night before he left we were packing the trailer, setting things up & my husband kept asking my daughter how to do things (like where to push the button to open the extension on the trailer). I smiled at my husband and said, “What are you going to do not having Kate there?” Later that night (around 11) I found my husband watching videos about “trailer sway” & he was worried. I honestly was worried how he would do.

I was so proud of my husband because he had never driven or operated an RV trailer (let alone a 27 ft one), so when he called me & told me how he had figured out all the water/dumping/electrical, had taken a shower, was watching a movie…I was so proud!! The best part–he was proud. He said, “I am now an RVer!! I can do anything on one of these things.”

Life is a journey. Life truly is what you make it. You can decide to struggle against the current or do your best to smile at the sun and float. It is a choice.

-Have a beautiful day!  -H

Trust in your life’s natural FLOW

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“Flow with whatever may happen and let your mind be free. Stay centered by accepting whatever you are doing. That is the ultimate.”  -Chuang Tzu

I just got back from a walk, the weather was rain when I started, so I began it with a attitude of enjoying the rain. While I was walking a woman approached me who was just starting on her walk, she asked me, “Is it getting better or worse?” I smiled, “it comes and goes, you just need to embrace it and enjoy the fresh smell of the beautiful rain.” She hurried on. I literally stopped and felt how this moment was like life, we have to enjoy the flow, whatever may come.

On my way back I pondered about my husband and how hard it has been on him mentally to begin again, to look for a job. I began to pray for my little family, knowing that God knows what is best for us. He knows what flow will be the right current that will take us to where we need to be. I continued to pray for His guidance, to help us allow what we need into our life.

Sometimes it is very hard to remember that he has a plan for everything. That there are not coincidences, only moments of grace. That he can guide, direct, change everything in a moment. That is where our faith needs to step in, to allow, to listen, to look for His direction.

We read this beautiful story before bed last night—it is amazing. It illustrates this whole idea beautifully. Enjoy.

The Tablecloth by Richard Bauman, from Chicken Soup for the Christian Family Soul

A young minister had been called to serve at an old church that at one time had been a magnificent edifice in a wealthy part of town. Now the area was in a state of decline and the church was in bad shape. Nevertheless, the pastor and his wife were thrilled with the church and believed they could restore it to its former magnificence.

When the minister took charge of the church early in October 1948, he and his wife immediately went to work painting, repairing and attempting to restore it. Their goal was to have the old edifice looking its best for Christmas Eve services.

Just two days before Christmas, however, a storm swept through the area, dumping more than an inch of rain. The roof of the old church spring a leak just behind the altar. The plaster soaked up the water as if it were a sponge and then crumbled, leaving a gaping hole in the wall.

Dejected, the pastor and his wife looked at the defaced wall. There was obviously no chance to repair the damage before Christmas. Nearly three months of hard work had been washed away. Yet the young couple accepted the damage as God’s will and set about cleaning up the damp debris.

It was a depressed minister and his wife who attended a benefit auction for the church youth group that afternoon. One of the items put up for bid was an old gold and ivory colored lace tablecloth, nearly fifteen feet long.

Seized with an inspiration, the pastor was the high bidder at $6.50. His idea was to hang the tablecloth behind the altar to cover the ragged hole in the wall.

On the day before Christmas, snowflakes mingled with the howling wind. As the pastor unlocked the church doors, he noticed an older woman standing at the nearby bus stop. He knew the bus wouldn’t be there for at least half an hour, so he invited her inside to keep warm.

She wasn’t from the neighborhood, she explained. She had been in the are to be interviewed for a job as a governess to the children of a well-known wealthy family. She had been a war refugee, her English was poor and she didn’t get the job.

Head bowed in prayer, she sat in the pew near the back of the church. She paid no attention to the pastor, who was hanging the tablecloth across the unsightly hole. When the woman looked up and saw the cloth she rushed to the altar.

“It’s mine!” she exclaimed. “It’s my banquet cloth!”

Excitedly she told the surprised minister its history and even showed him her initials embroidered in one corner.

She and her husband had lived in Vienna, Austria, and had opposed the Nazis before the Second World War. THey decided to flee to Switzerland, but her husband said they must go separately. She left first. Later she heard that he had died in a concentration camp.

Touched by her story, the minister insisted that she take the cloth. She thought about it for a moment but said no, she didn’t need it any longer, and it looked pretty hanging behind the altar. Then she said good-bye and left.

In the candlelight of the Christmas Eve services, the tablecloth looked even more magnificent. The white lace seemed dazzling in the flickering light of the candles, and the golden threads woven through it were like the brilliant rays of a new dawn.

As members of the congregation left the church, they complimented the pastor on the services and on how beautiful the church looked.

One older gentlemen lingered, admiring the tablecloth, and as he was leaving he said to the minister: “It’s strange. Many years ago my wife–God rest her—and I owned such a tablecloth. She used it only on very special occasions. But we lived in Vienna then.”

The night air was freezing, but the goosebumps on the pastor’s skin weren’t caused by the weather. As calmly as he could, he told the man about the woman who had been to the church that very afternoon.

“Can it be,” gasped the old man, tears streaming down his chicks, “that she is alive? How can I find her?”

The pastor remembered the name of the family who had interviewed the woman. With the trembling old man at his side, he telephoned the family and learned her name and address.

In the pastor’s old car they drove to her home on the other side of town. Together they knocked on her apartment door. When she opened it, the pastor witnessed the tearful, joyful and thrilling reunion of husband and wife.

Some people would call it an extremely lucky chance happening, the result of a hole in the church wall, an old tablecloth, a pastor’s ingenuity in solving a problem and so on. But the combination of events was far too complex for it to have merely “coincidence.”

If one link in the fragile chain of events had been broken, the husband and wife might never have found each other. If the rain hadn’t come, if the church roof hadn’t leaked, if the pastor had decided not to go to the auction, if the woman hadn’t been looking for a job or standing on that corner at just the right time…the list of ifs is virtually endless.

It was simply God’s will. And, as it has been said many times, He works in mysterious ways.

I hope you enjoyed this beautiful story. I hope it touched your soul and will set you in a good place for your day. Peace, Love and Joy to you.  -Heather